Frequently Asked Questions

home Degrees & Certificates Courses CTE/CMU Program Professors  Jobs Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's)

Allegheny CampusBoyce CampusNorth CampusSouth Campus
CCAC has 8 additional Satellite Branches, each campus page will have the information for 2 of these Branches.

Table of Contents

  1. What are the changes made to the Fall 2000 CIT curriculum?
  2. What are the CIT course prerequisites & titles?
  3. What computer programs does CCAC offer?
  4. What is Computer & Information Technology?
  5. What is the difference between Information Systems and Computer Science?
  6. What are CTE (500 series) courses and what is their relationship to regular CIT courses?
  7. I have very little experience in using a computer - essentially I know how to turn it on and surf the Net. Should I start with CIT111 or CIT501?
  8. I want to take an introductory programming course. Where should I start?
  9. I have a basic computer literacy background. Do I need to take CIT115 (or CIT502)?
  10. I have some previous experience with programming (COBOL or Fortran or Pascal or Visual Basic) and am interested in taking CIT130 Object-Oriented Programming: Java. Can I take this course?

What are the changes made to the Fall 2000 CIT curriculum?

The changes include the following items:

  • It was considered desirable to add 1 credit to CIT110 and CIT160 to cover the course material. This required that different course numbers for these 2 courses. Starting in Fall 2000, CIT111 replaces CIT110 and CIT161 replaces CIT160.

  • Students who have completed CIT110 have the prerequisite corresponding to CIT111.
  • Students who have completed CIT160 have the prerequisite corresponding to CIT161.
  • CTE (Carnegie Technology Education, a subsidiary of CMU) courses offered by CCAC now have a separate identity. Starting in the Fall 2000, CIT501-CIT505 replace courses CIT110-CT, CIT115-CT, CIT130-CT, CIT160-CT and CIT245-CT respectively. Course descriptions indicate those courses that are comparable to the 100-200 series CIT courses. Students who have completed courses with the old identities have the prerequisites of the corresponding new course numbers.

The table below shows the new course identities and the old one they have replaced:

New Courses - Fall 2000

Old Identities

Comparable

CIT111 Information Systems with Programming (4 cr)

CIT110 (3 cr)

CIT161 User Interface Design: Visual Basic (4 cr)

CIT160 (3 cr)

CIT501 Introduction to Information Systems (4 cr)

CIT110-CT (3 cr)

CIT111 (4 cr)

CIT502 Introduction to Computer Systems

CIT115-CT

CIT115

CIT503 Object-Oriented Programming & Design

CIT130-CT

CIT130

CIT504 User-Centered Interface Design & Testing (4 cr)

CIT160-CT (3cr)

CIT161 (4 cr)

CIT505 Data Structures & Algorithms

CIT245-CT

CIT245


Some of the course prerequisites have been modified to help ensure that students do not sign up for courses without the proper prerequisite background.

Back to Table of Contents

What are the CIT course prerequisites & titles?

  • The approved, correct course titles and prerequisites are shown in the accompanying CIT course description list. Course flowcharts visually show the prerequisite structure as well.
  • Please note that in some cases, the credit magazine and catalog prerequisites and/or descriptions are incorrect, so use these and note the new/old course number table above.
Back to Table of Contents

What computer programs does CCAC offer?

CCAC offers a variety of computing programs - these include:

A career CIT Associate Program which has a common core of course and 3 tracks of specialization:

      1. Application Software Development

      2. End-User Support

      3. Networking

Several shorter term career CIT certificates
A transfer Computer Information Science program
These programs are explained in detail in accompanying pages.

Back to Table of Contents

What is Computer & Information Technology?

Computers and networks have become essential in most segments of our society and enable us to improve the quality of our lives and to increase our productivity. Their use has resulted in significant advances in medicine, science, education, business, industry, and government. Computer and information technology incorporates the study of information structure and processing in all its varied forms.  The term Information Technology (IT) is an "umbrella" term that encompasses Information Systems, Information Science and Computer Science.

Back to Table of Contents

What is the difference between Information Systems and Computer Science?

  • Both Information Systems and Computer Science and require a common subset of technical computing knowledge.

  • Information Systems is the study of what computers can do, how they can be applied, and how to obtain practical computing solutions in business environments.  Since the context for Information Systems is an organization, students typically also need to develop skills to solve business problems in functional areas such as accounting, finance, marketing and management.  Systems analysis in the context of applied computing is a fundamental focus of this discipline.

  • The discipline includes the acquisition, deployment and management of Information Technology resources and services as well as the development of the IT infrastructure to support the organization process. This includes computers and communications; development of computer systems and supporting users in the use of new technology. There is a high demand for individuals with a combined knowledge of applied computing, computer applications and business.

  • A number of colleges have programs identified as Information Science. These programs may denote a more general computing emphasis that is not directly tied to business organizational use.

  • Computer Science focuses on the theory and practice of computing.  Some important topics covered include data structures, algorithms, computer architecture and software engineering.   The development of quality software is a fundamental focus of this discipline.   There is a high demand for individuals who possess the technical skills to develop software systems.

Back to Table of Contents

What are CTE (500 series) courses and what is their relationship to regular CIT courses?

  • These courses allow students to prepare for a programming certificate provided by CTE/CMU while moving through CCAC's CIT course work. They are taught through a CCAC partnership with Carnegie Technology Education (CTE), a Carnegie Mellon University subsidiary- a national leader in computer science education.
  • The first 3 courses (CIT111/CIT501), CIT115/CIT502, and CIT130/CIT503 are considered equivalent, however the CTE courses may be more intense than the comparable, corresponding 100-200 level CIT courses.
  • Although CIT161 is listed as comparable to CIT504, there are substantial differences in focus.
  • CIT161 focuses much more on the Visual Basic language and its use to access data in databases and other media. CIT504 focuses essentially on Human-Computer interface issues and usability studies. Visual Basic is a much smaller component of the course and database access is not considered at all.
  • For more detailed information about this program, please visit the following web site: http://www.carnegietech.org
Back to Table of Contents

I have very little experience in using a computer - essentially I know how to turn it on and surf the Net. Should I start with CIT111 or CIT501?

  • Both courses assume a comfort level with using computers in a Windows environment. Students have this background from a variety of sources. You should be comfortable in doing the following types of computer tasks:

  1. Use a mouse and keyboard effectively

  2. Use a Windows type application, such as a word processor or other editor program, that uses common Windows icons and terminology, including copying and pasting with the clipboard.

  3. Be able to manage your files, using Windows Explorer or similar file manager. This includes running programs, finding files and documents, creating folders/directories to organize your data, copying files and making backups.
  4. Be familiar with using a Browser to view Web pages.


CCAC offers a 1-credit pass/fail course entitled CIT Introduction to Windows, which covers the basic user interface. CCAC also offers a 3-credit computer literacy course entitled CIT100 Introduction to Computers, which goes into more depth with using Windows applications.

Back to Table of Contents

I want to take an introductory programming course. Where should I start?

Start with CIT111 (or CIT501). This course is a gentle introduction to programming, mostly using Java programming language as a vehicle.

Back to Table of Contents

I have a basic computer literacy background. Do I need to take CIT115 (or CIT502)?

This course assumes a basic computer background as a prerequisite. It includes more in-depth material associated with software and hardware used in a network-based environment.

Back to Table of Contents

I have some previous experience with programming (COBOL or Fortran or Pascal or Visual Basic) and am interested in taking CIT130 Object-Oriented Programming: Java. Can I take this course?

You should take CIT111 (CIT501) first, unless your experience is in C or C++, which has very similar syntax. You should discuss your particular situation with a CIT faculty advisor.

Back to Table of Contents

Copyright 2001  Community College of Allegheny. All rights reserved.
Revised: August 07, 2007 .
Milo Course & Student Info
(Only lists Available Class Sections)
Contact Us
(citadmin@ccac.edu)
CCAC
(www.ccac.edu)

Copyright 2001 Community College of Allegheny County. All rights reserved.